Container News

 

When the family cabin getaway began to crumble and fall apart, two brothers in northern Minnesota decided to build a replacement on their own. They had to take into consideration both their small budget and the extreme weather in the area. After purchasing two old shipping containers for $800 each, they built this cabin on-site by themselves. When finished, it will be able to accommodate both brothers and their wives and feature birch interior walls and a grey-water system.

If your interested in a container for a project like this or something similar, contact AZ Containers at 877-292-6937 to see how the most basic steel box to a customized, climate controlled storage or workspace with windows, they’ll have your solution on it’s way to you fast.

 

This shipping container home from the so-called Domestique Project in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada is a residential home. The home is built out of old shipping containers, and the owner chose to paint them with an industrial strength minty-green enamel, commonly found on shipping containers today, in order to maintain the container’s roots in the shipping business. While the exterior of the home may look a little rugged, due to the protruding containers, the 2,000 square foot interior of the house is quite comfortable and modern. The project cost about $150 per square foot, compared to a similar quality traditional construction project that can cost about $250 per square foot.

       

If your interested in a container for a project like this or something similar, contact AZ Containers at 877-292-6937 to see how the most basic steel box to a customized, climate controlled storage or workspace with windows, they’ll have your solution on it’s way to you fast.

New ones and single trip containers for re-sale and storage were few and far between but that changed a few years back and re-sale of new containers became mainstream. 

The recession has made everyone resourceful and we are finding new opportunities.  Suddenly we are finding many more containers available on sites like e-bay as people either go out of business or look to cash in on assets that are no longer needed.  We have found ourselves buying back many that we have sold previously – and thankfully most of them are still in good nick!  A credit to our painters.  We like to keep a range in stock so we are just as happy to buy back a used unit as we are to buy in new ones – depending on customer requirements.  Whatever type of unit we supply we try to make sure it meets our customers requirements at the right price.

If your interested in a container for a project, contact AZ Containers at 877-292-6937 to see how the most basic steel box to a customized, climate controlled storage or workspace with windows, they’ll have your solution on it’s way to you fast.

 

 

The quality of containers increased dramatically and the storage and site services users demanded higher quality and there were some manufacturers that were only too happy to oblige and manufactured containers. The upshot is that there is a real mix of containers in the storage and site services market and those in the container resale business have to keep a sharp eye on how things are changing.

We now buy containers from shipping lines and manufacturers as well as buying them back from customers and also buying from auction sites. Types of containers have changed and expanded too.  As well as the 20ft, we can get up to the 48ft., reefers, half-heights, open tops, refrigerated, flatracks and others.

If your interested in a container for a project like this or something similar, contact AZ Containers at 877-292-6937 to see how the most basic steel box to a customized, climate controlled storage or workspace with windows, they’ll have your solution on it’s way to you fast.

We aim to provide our customers with a personal, fast and efficient service, which will offer a hassle free solution to any storage problem. More importantly, there are no hidden costs when purchasing  or leasing storage containers from AZ Containers.

 

Supplying storage containers to sports clubs and school, college and university sports departments across the country is something is done regularly. We can  supplied football, rugby, cricket, archery, canoe, sailing, golf, tennis, rowing, athletics, running, hockey, bowls, gymnastics and trampolining clubs among others and even Homing pigeon and allotment societies. 

The containers would be able to offer the range of storing for all your activities it does without having the space to store the equipment so now senior and junior athletes alike can benefit from a better range of equipment for training and competition and allows coaches to deliver higher added value sessions.  We feel sure you'll soon be back for another.

If your interested in a container for a project like this or something similar, contact AZ Containers at 877-292-6937 to see how the most basic steel box to a customized, climate controlled storage or workspace with windows, they’ll have your solution on it’s way to you fast.

We aim to provide our customers with a personal, fast and efficient service, which will offer a hassle free solution to any storage problem. More importantly, there are no hidden costs when purchasing  or leasing storage containers from us.

 

In 2005 terrace restaurant Wijn of Water (Wine or Water) in the Lloyd-quarter in Rotterdam opened its doors. The restaurant is a composition with sea-containers. The building is temporary, this or next year the restaurant will be housed in the Sint Jobsveem warehouse, 250 meters away. Because of this temporaryness, there was a limited budget. The restaurant was brought up from scratch to completion in just half a year. The principal himself took care of the construction.

The chosen building blocks are nine second hand 40 feet containers, measuring 12,2 meters and making a section of 2,5 x 2,9 meters. All the installations are placed on the outside, giving it an extra utilitarian touch. Towards the city the composition forms a wall, here two containers are stacked. On the first floor they contain an office and a room for the installations.

After entering the restaurant opens up, facing the Maas canal. On one side the terrace is embraced by a single laying container. A smaller one is placed in line with the large volume, this makes, in combination with the tower placed container, two terraces. The erected container is a such a marker for the restaurant and also forms a compositoric counterbalance for the large wall. On a practical level its a storage place.

Some of the doors of the containers are opened and filled with a film of glass. An much to ordinary radiator brakes the visual nice gesture of openness. The long sides of the containers, facing the terraces are opened up and filled with huge glass windows. The work and office spaces have smaller windows. Inside the restaurant there are smaller boxes to host toilets and kitchen storage. The spatial compostion of the containers and their new contents make somehow logical sense at the pier.

  • 4.1.1 Corner Fitting. Internationally standard fitting (casting) located at the eight corners of the container structure to provide means of handling, stacking and securing containers. Specifications are defined in ISO 1161.
  • 4.1.2 Corner Post. Vertical structural member located at the four corners of the container and to which the corner fittings are joined.
  • 4.1.3 Door Header. Lateral structural member situated over the door opening and joined to the corner fittings in the door end frame.
  • 4.1.4 Door Sill. Lateral structural member at the bottom of the door opening and joined to the corner fittings in the door end frame.

     
  • 4.1.5 Rear End Frame. The structural assembly at the rear (door end) of the container consisting of the door sill and header joined at the rear corner fittings to the rear corner posts to form the door opening.
  • 4.1.6 Top End Rail. Lateral structural member situated at the top edge of the front end (opposite the door end) of the container and joined to the corner fittings.
  • 4.1.7 Bottom End Rail. Lateral structural member situated at the bottom edge of the front end (opposite the door end) of the container and joined to the corner fittings.
  • 4.1.8 Front End Frame. The structural assembly at the front end (opposite the door end) of the container consisting of top and bottom end rails joined at the front corner fittings to the front corner posts.
  • 4.1.9 Top Side Rail. Longitudinal structural member situated at the top edge of each side of the container and joined to the corner fittings of the end frames.
  • 4.1.10 Bottom Side Rail. Longitudinal structural member situated at the bottom edge of each side of the container and joined to the corner fittings to form a part of the understructure.
  • 4.1.11 Cross Member. Lateral structural member attached to the bottom side rails that supports the
  • flooring.
  • 4.1.12 Understructure. An assembly consisting of bottom side and end rails, door sill (when applicable), cross members and forklift pockets.
  • 4.1.13 Forklift Pocket. Reinforced tunnel (installed in pairs) situated transversely across the understructure and providing openings in the bottom side rails at ISO prescribed positions to enable either empty capacity or empty and loaded capacity container handling by forklift equipment.
  • 4.1.14 Forklift Pocket Strap. The plate welded to the bottom of each forklift pocket opening or part of bottom siderail. The forklift pocket strap is a component of the forklift pocket.
  • 4.1.15 Gooseneck Tunnel. Recessed area in the forward portion of the understructure to accommodate transport by a gooseneck chassis. This feature is more common in forty foot and longer containers.

The 12 Container House is a custom prefab green home created from 12 recycled shipping containers. This "T-shaped" 2-story summer home features floor to ceiling windows, concrete floors, two fireplaces and radiant in-floor heating. 

 

          

It is both ubiquitous and original, small and large, intimate and expansive.  Kalkin’s creative architectural arsenal seems to have more corners and secret rooms than any one could every fully explore.  Arguably the premiere example of shipping container architecture.

The 600-pound glass door, which took about a month to build and mount, rolls on a custom ball-bear rolling system that Stulberg put together.  The nine-foot square extends the interior and provides a good amount of natural light during the day.

Stulberg used plasma cutters for the openings and finished the space with soy-based foam insulation, sanded plywood, Homasote recycled paper, and a ductless mini-split air conditioner and heater.  Like the door, Stulberg built the box lights himself which take low-output halogens.

Not counting pizza and coffee for helpful friends, Stulberg tells us he spent about $16,000 building the Studio Pod, though he could do it for a lot less next time.  That’s because he bought some tools and made a few miscalculations fabricating window prototypes and other things.

Recognizing that others may have the same itch that Stulberg had when he determined to build the Studio Pod, the owner said, “You can slice and dice a container in amazing ways and simply reinforce the structure with steel when holes are cut into its structure.”  So there’s no need to limit your creative juices when working with shipping containers.

 

Located in South Melbourne, Australia, and designed by Phooey Architects, is the green Children’s Activity Centre at Skinners Playground.  This piece of shipping container architecture is made of four cargo shipping containers.  The environment is a familiar one: micro-landscapes, sheds and objects that are somewhere between toy and assault course. Color is everywhere, in equal strengths and volumes so that no single color dominates, and the compound is still shrill when the kids are absent.
       

The form and aesthetics were generated by sustainable architecture strategies aimed at zero waste. When the four re-used containers were joined in a staggered arrangement, intimate and public spaces were created for a variety of functions including study, painting, dancing and lounging about. Each container was oriented to produce visual and physical connections to surrounding playground spaces.